13th June 2021
  • 9:11 pm Through the Eyes of Ides Ofune – Women Shouldn’t Have to Choose Between Motherhood and Higher Education
  • 12:31 pm PhD Researcher Oladapo Ajayi is improving the lives of underserved children through his NGO AfRII
  • 7:30 am The Rising Cost of Private Schools in Nigeria
  • 2:42 pm Meet Lawrence Okon Founder of Read Empire with the aim of alleviating poverty among young graduates
  • 4:58 pm Prevention is Better than Rehabilitation says 24 Year Old Adebimpe Adebara Founder of Piece of my Heart Foundation
  • 3:48 pm Read about how Pamela Stephen established Fortress Foundation to help teenagers overcome sexual abuse

According to the recent guidelines released by the World Health Organisation (WHO), children under five must spend less time sitting down watching screens including televisions and phones. They must get more time for active play and better quality sleep in order to grow up healthy. Experts from the organisation reviewed evidence around the benefits of increased activity level and made recommendations.

According to WHO, failure to meet current physical activity recommendations is responsible for more than 5 million deaths globally each year across all age groups.  Currently, over 23% of adults and 80% of adolescents are not sufficiently physically active. For a 24 hour period, replace sedentary activity and screen time with more interactive non screen based activities such as reading, storytelling, singing and puzzles which are very important for a child’s development.

Infants (less than 1 year) should:

  • Be physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through interactive floor-based play; more is better. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes in prone position (tummy time) spread throughout the day while awake.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g. prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back). Screen time is not recommended. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged. 
  • Have 14–17h (0–3 months of age) or 12–16h (4–11 months of age) of good quality sleep, including naps.

Children 1-2 years of age should:

  1. Spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, including moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better.

  2. Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back) or sit for extended periods of time. For 1-year-olds, sedentary screen time (such as watching TV or videos, playing computer games) is not recommended. For those aged 2 years, sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.

  3. Have 11-14 hours of good quality sleep, including naps, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

Children 3-4 years of age should:

  • Spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, of which at least 60 minutes is moderate- to vigorous intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers) or sit for extended periods of time. Sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 10–13h of good quality sleep, which may include a nap, with regular sleep and wake-up times.
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